Six Sentence Sunday, 21 August 2011 (The Lost Pissarro)

The world had shifted around them, and Angie Stavros took a sort of grim satisfaction in it, that now most of the world felt as dislocated as she did. Welcome to my world, she thought as she caught a glimpse into Central Park, a flash of unicorns in the grottoes. Ironically it was a lot safer to go jogging in Central Park now, at least if one feared human predators. She picked up her pace. The wind brought a sense of restlessness and trouble, a wind with no name but very like its cousins who blew out of the emptiness of the Sahara or the ocean voids of the Antarctic. The wind blew her hair into her eyes and tugged at her broad-brimmed hat, and prickled on the exposed forearms under the rolled sleeves of her sensible shirt with its many pockets and its epaulets.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized, Writing and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Six Sentence Sunday, 21 August 2011 (The Lost Pissarro)

  1. I need to know more now! Great six!

  2. Vivien Dean says:

    Your prose is always so evocative. Thanks for sharing!

  3. Jayel Kaye says:

    What wonderful descriptions

  4. Piper says:

    You are amazing with description. No matter what you write I always feel like I’m right there in the thick of things. Awesome six!

  5. sassyspeaks says:

    unicorns in the park, a wind with no name, beautiful

  6. Sounds a bit ominous! Great six!

  7. Daisy Harris says:

    Great six! Very evocative, and I love that u used central park!

  8. I love the idea of dislocation. What a great way to put that feeling to words!

  9. Monica Enderle Pierce says:

    I love idea of unicorns in the grottoes of Central Park. Very evocative, as always.

  10. J.A. Beard says:

    A love the juxtaposition of the fantastic with Central Park, a place normally rather mundane and even a bit gritty in places.

  11. Bree Younger says:

    I love how detailed yet immediate your descriptions are.

  12. Lisa Fox says:

    Wow! That is an amazingly vivid passage.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s