NaNoFeed: All novelists are liars, but not all liars are novelists

I woke up late today, after writing too late last night, and then had my entire day eaten in double-checking a story that proved to be a lie. Which struck me funny, in an odd sidelong way, because I’d been up late the night before lying my head off.

All novelists are liars. Of course. So how is a novel different from a garden-variety prevarication?

It’s truthful. “Once upon a time” is a mask; once under its shelter, we can speak the truth that we can’t in full sunlight. In the fictional town of N–, beloved of Russian novelists, we can tell the dirty secrets of our own home town.

It’s consistent. Nine times out of ten, I catch a lie by means of internal contradiction, which is to say, a failure of craft on the part of the liar.

It has its own agenda. Liars lie to get something, or get back at someone. Their lies are weapons seized randomly, in the dark, and slashed about to catch hapless shins or skulls. A novelist might have a list of targets–all of us do (ask me about “Anne-Marie Writes a Memo,” dedicated to one of my least favorite ex-workmates, may she fry in hell)–but a novel has its own shape, and the good novelist is ready to drop one assassination target off the list to substitute another.

(Yes, and I have a love of violent metaphors. That comes of dealing with lying liars who lie.)

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in NaNoWriMo, Writing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to NaNoFeed: All novelists are liars, but not all liars are novelists

  1. Wow! You captured my thoughts! I recently watched a movie in which a girl had to lie in order to save herself from a difficult situation; it so happens that the girl was a WRITER and she was told she SHOULD be a good liar as she was a writer and must have an a wild imagination. This just made think of writers and the worlds they create and I do think being a writer with a wild imagination gives you some sort of advantage when it comes to lying. NOT to say that lying is a good thing! It isn’t!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s